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Alpha Release
Climate Physics is up and running. People involved in these initial weeks are helping us to get a solid start and some initial content ready for an official launch day. Thank you!
We need people to sign up and add content. Introduce yourself at the Meet and Greet forum. Speak up to welcome a few others. Have a look at the guidelines, then start a thread, or contribute to someone else's thread, in "General discussion" about something frivolous. Give ideas and suggestions and problems in "Feedback". Write about a recent or an important paper in "Published papers". Try your hand at a "Tutorial". And also, if another thread by someone else looks interesting, add something to it!
We need people to put a bit of work into getting the board active and humming in these early days. You can help off-site as well, by blogging about it, or blogging about an interesting thread.
There will be a public launch of the new board in late June or early July with some special events. By then the board will hopefully be working spontaneously and we can all relax a bit at a job well done to get it going... and I will remove these distracting notices.
Ideas or suggestions for Climate Physics forums may be added in the feedback forum without registration.

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Our aim is to support substantive discussion of the science of climate, especially the underlying physics. We focus on ideas that have been published in the conventional scientific literature. This still allows for all kinds of competing ideas to be considered, while hopefully avoiding distraction from ideas that have no credible basis.

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Hello
Topic Started: Mar 9 2010, 07:31 AM (492 Views)
Nick

Hey sylas ^_^ Nice forum!
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sylas
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Nick
Mar 9 2010, 07:31 AM
Hey sylas ^_^ Nice forum!
Thanks Nick. And note, you have been promoted from novice to member with a single post. After the launch we'll increase the number of posts required for promotion.
Edited by sylas, Mar 9 2010, 09:28 AM.
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apsmith

"sylas" - thanks for setting this up!
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sylas
Board owner
apsmith
Mar 17 2010, 04:10 PM
"sylas" - thanks for setting this up!
Thanks for signing up, Arthur! If you'd like to get involved, there's lots to do. You can post an introduction in General discussion, set up your profile, and add a little initial content to "seed" the board for when we launch.
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Sorry

Hey sylas! Thanks for informing me about your new forums I'll gladly be checking it out and and taking part in discussions here. :D
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sylas
Board owner
Sorry
May 5 2010, 03:18 PM
Hey sylas! Thanks for informing me about your new forums I'll gladly be checking it out and and taking part in discussions here. :D
Wonderful! Thanks for coming along.

Posts in this Sandbox forum are not likely to remain stable. Feel free to post a self-introduction in General Discussion, or something of the sort.

Cheers -- sylas

[moderate=sylas]Topic moved from sandbox to here[/moderate]
Edited by sylas, May 5 2010, 03:40 PM.
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Hank Roberts

Good to see this happening, thank you.
Do you have a 'Contributors' list of the real scientists involved?
(I'm not among them, just posting from the audience/student body)
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sylas
Board owner
Hank Roberts
May 9 2010, 05:57 PM
Good to see this happening, thank you.
Do you have a 'Contributors' list of the real scientists involved?
(I'm not among them, just posting from the audience/student body)
No; no contributors list. There's the members list, which amounts to the same thing... and anyone can indicate their background in their profile.

From my experience on other bulletin boards, and physicsforums in particular, I think there's no need to identify the real scientists.

Frankly, we probably won't get many. The real scientists are usually too busy. Some members may prefer to be pseudonymous. And when we do get some real scientists involved who don't mind being known, it will probably fall out fairly naturally in discussions. In the meantime, I think there is a considerable amount of good amateur expertise around and we have a reasonable chance of tapping into that.

Also, there is nothing like trying to explain something to other people for helping you learn yourself. I've found this to be true at every level, from engagement online to professional teaching. (I used to be a lecturer in Computer Science, and teaching a course was a great way to learn more about the subject.)

I'm hoping that with a sharp body of readers and commenters we'll be able to get some good quality feedback that will keep the level well worthwhile for readers who are not expert. As the board develops I expect we will get a few genuine experts to join in from time to time and that will be great. But I think we can still get good material from enthusiastic students and amateurs.

I am trying to tee up some genuinely expert guest contributors for the formal launch of the board, however!
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Little Mouse

Hello Sylas,
There is a need for sites that cover the gap between scientists and the informed but still somewhat ignorant general public, so yours is a welcome addition. It is surprisingly easy to be well informed of latest developments and stunningly ignorant of the basics.

So back to basics for me, or should I say to the basics.

Have you thought about a screwy theories section. I had this theory that global warming plus global dimming would accelerate ice loss. Wrong as it turns out. Light intensity, is positively correlated with ice loss according to a study of European glaciers (sorry lost the reference)

It is so easy to add 2 + 2 and get anything. One factor that this little doomsaying mouse did not appreciate is the lag of natural CO2 increase caused by temperature. If there is an 800 year lag before the full response is in, we may not be doomed just yet.
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sylas
Board owner
Little Mouse
May 19 2010, 01:17 AM
Have you thought about a screwy theories section. I had this theory that global warming plus global dimming would accelerate ice loss. Wrong as it turns out. Light intensity, is positively correlated with ice loss according to a study of European glaciers (sorry lost the reference)
Hi Little Mouse!

I saw you when you sneaked in quietly, and it's good to have you posting! Consider introducing yourself at "Meet and Greet".

I've been thinking a bit about what sections we could reasonably add. I'm rather dubious of a "screwy theories" section, but I think there might be a useful role for a "worked problems" section, where people can try applying some basics to specific issues and seeing what they come up with. If someone has a theory which is based on some identifiable principles then it could be well worth finding a mouse hole for them! Such exercises can be really useful; even when wrong! (Especially if you can recognize when they are wrong! Not everyone is good at that.) The act of working through them and turning them loose on to prowling cats to tear into can often be really instructive to all concerned.

I think I would need to see the reference before I really get what you are speaking of with ice loss. Actually ice loss is accelerated by global warming. Global dimming usually refers to the decrease in solar energy to the surface that results from increasing reflectance, from aerosols in particular. It was significant from about the middle of the twentieth century on, but aerosols are now tending to decline, with a consequent brightening. Dimming has the opposite effect to warming, tending to cool the planet, and mask some of the effects of global warming.

What happens at individual glaciers can be very complex as it depends more than global temperatures. It depends on regional conditions, and in particular also depends on precipitation influence.

But a reference would be very handy to talk about the details!

Little Mouse
 
It is so easy to add 2 + 2 and get anything. One factor that this little doomsaying mouse did not appreciate is the lag of natural CO2 increase caused by temperature. If there is an 800 year lag before the full response is in, we may not be doomed just yet.


Um... the 800 year lag usually refers to the lag between temperature changes as the most recent ice age was ending, and the associated rise in carbon dioxide. In that case, it was temperature change first, carbon dioxide change following.The initial impetus for climate change at that time was most likely small changes in Earth's orbit (the Milankovitch cycles theory), and then as temperature increases the ocean tends to release carbon dioxide, which then gives a further positive feedback which is needed to account for the full magnitude of changes that occur.

The current situation has carbon dioxide levels being driven not by a warming ocean, but by industrial emissions, and so that is the initial impetus, with temperature change following after as a result. The radiative effect of atmospheric carbon is immediate, and the time delays in temperature response are to do with how long it takes an ocean to warm up. This time can be considerable, but most of the response should be within decades, rather than 800 years. We had better hope so! The time lag in this case is the length of time for which warming will continue to occur until approaching equilibrium. If this is a really long time, then it corresponds to a really substantial change.

Cheers -- sylas
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